Saturday, April 30, 2022

New Comet C/2022 F1 (ATLAS)

CBET 5112 & MPEC 2022-G82, issued on 2022, April 06, announce the discovery of a comet (magnitude ~18.5) on CCD images taken on Mar. 30.3 UT with a 0.5-m f/2 Wright-Schmidt reflector at Rio Hurtado, Chile, in the course of the "Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System" (ATLAS) search program. The new comet has been designated C/2022 F1 (ATLAS).

Stacking of 20 unfiltered exposures, 90 seconds each, obtained remotely on 2022, April 2.4 from X02 (Telescope Live, Chile) through a 0.61-m f/6.5 astrograph + CCD, shows that this object is a comet with a compact coma about 9" arcsecond in diameter (Observers E. Bryssinck, M. Rocchetto, E. Guido, M. Fulle, G. Milani, G. Savini, A. Valvasori).

Our confirmation image (click on the images for a bigger version)


CBET 5112 assigns the following parabolic orbital elements to comet C/2022 F1 (ATLAS): T 2022 Sep. 4.00; e= 0.99; Peri. =  281.10; q = 5.94 ;  Incl.= 57.98; adding that: "these suggest that the comet will pass 1.46 AU from Saturn in 2025 August".


by Ernesto Guido


Tuesday, March 22, 2022

New Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF) [may reach mag. +6 in Feb. 2023]

CBET 5111 & MPEC 2022-F13, issued on 2022, March 21, announce the discovery of an apparently asteroidal object (magnitude ~17) discovered on CCD images taken on Mar. 2 UT with a  1.2-m f/2.4 Schmidt telescope at Palomar in the course of the  "Zwicky Transient Facility" (ZTF) survey (MPC code I41). Subsequently, it has been found to show cometary appearance by CCD astrometrists elsewhere. The new comet has been designated C/2022 E3 (ZTF).

Stacking of 12 unfiltered exposures, 120 seconds each, obtained remotely on 2022, March 20.4 from X02 (Telescope Live, Chile) through a 0.61-m f/6.5 astrograph + CCD, shows that this object is a comet with a compact coma about 9" arcsecond in diameter (Observers E. Guido, M. Rocchetto, E. Bryssinck, G. Milani, G. Savini, A. Valvasori).


Our confirmation image (click on the images for a bigger version; made with TYCHO software by D. Parrott)

 
 

MPEC 2022-F13 assigns the following orbital elements to comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF): T 2023 Jan. 13.18; e= 0.99; Peri. =  145.77; q = 1.11 ;  Incl.= 109.09


Credit: MPC

 

According to CBET 5111: "These preliminary elements indicate that the comet will pass 0.28 AU from the earth in early Feb. 2023, when the comet may be near total visual magnitude 6; these also suggest that the comet passed about 1.18 AU from Saturn in 2020 May and about 3.07 AU from Jupiter in 2021 April." Below you can see a graph generated using the software Orbitas and showing the predicted magnitude (in red) versus its elongation from the Sun. As always with comets, the future magnitudes reported here are only indicative.
 



by Ernesto Guido


Wednesday, March 16, 2022

New Comet C/2022 E2 (ATLAS)

CBET 5109 & MPEC 2022-E227, issued on 2022, March 15, announce the discovery of an apparently asteroidal object (magnitude ~19) discovered on CCD images taken on Mar. 7 UT with a 0.5-m f/2 Schmidt reflector at Rio Hurtado, Chile, in the course of the "Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System" (ATLAS) search program. Subsequently, it has been found to show cometary appearance by CCD astrometrists elsewhere after it was posted on the Minor Planet Center's PCCP webpage. The new comet has been designated C/2022 E2 (ATLAS).

Stacking of 25 unfiltered exposures, 120 seconds each, obtained remotely on 2022, March 10.3 from X02 (Telescope Live, Chile) through a 0.61-m f/6.5 astrograph + CCD, shows that this object is a comet with a compact coma about 7" arcsecond in diameter (Observers E. Guido, M. Rocchetto, E. Bryssinck, G. Milani, G. Savini, A. Valvasori).


Our confirmation image (click on the images for a bigger version; made with TYCHO software by D. Parrott)


 

MPEC 2022-E227 assigns the following orbital elements to comet C/2022 E2 (ATLAS): T 2024 Sep. 16.95; e= 0.99; Peri. =  41.84; q = 3.67 ;  Incl.= 137.13


Credit: MPC


This comet could reach total magnitude ~13 in late 2024.  Below you can see a graph generated using the software Orbitas and showing the predicted magnitude (in red) versus its elongation from the Sun. As always with comets, the future magnitudes reported here are only indicative.

 



by Ernesto Guido

Saturday, March 12, 2022

Small Asteroid 2022 EB5 (NEOCP Sar2593) impacted Earth on March 11

On 2022 March 11.80, K. Sarneczky found a small asteroid using the 0.60-m Schmidt + CCD of GINOP-KHK, Piszkesteto (K88 MPC code) that was soon after put on the NEOCP list with the provisional designation Sar2593 for the follow-up by other observers. The Minor Planet Center subsequently assigned the following official designation to this object 2022 EB5.


Discovery images (19:25UT) of asteroid 2022 EB5

Credit: K. Sarneczky 


At 20:46UT of March 11, Bill Gray sent an alert in the MPML mailing list about the impact of Sar2593 with the Earth's atmosphere and: "to urge European observers to take a look for this object, currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47, longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland". Below you can see a map of the impact location as calculated by Gray, southwest of Jan Mayen island.


Credit: B. Gray


Below an animation showing the impact trajectory 

Credit: T. Dunn


Below a follow-up image obtained by P. Bacci & M. Maestripieri at the San Marcello Pistoiese Observatory (104 MPC code) just about 15 minutes before its impact. 

Credit: Gamp/UAI

2022 EB5 is a small Apollo asteroid with an estimated size of 1.0 m - 2.3 m (based on the object's absolute magnitude H=32.1). 2022 EB5 impact infrasound  detection in Greenland had been published by P. Brown: "From this data yield is approximately 2-3 kT TNT. At 15 km/s, this is roughly 3-4 m diameter".

Credit: P. Brown


This is the fifth time in history that an impacting object is observed prior to atmospheric entry. The first time it happened was with asteroid 2008 TC3, the second was with asteroid 2014 AA, the third was 2018 LA that impacted Earth on 02 June 2018, the fourth was with asteroid 2019 MO that impacted Earth on 22 June 2019. Another space impacting object discovered prior to its to atmospheric entry was WT1190F but it is thought to have been a space debris, possibly  the translunar injection module of Lunar Prospector. For more info about 2008 TC3, 2014 AA, 2018 LA and 2019 MO see also:


http://remanzacco.blogspot.it/2008/10/small-asteroid-2008-tc3-to-hit-earth.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2008/10/2008-tc3-animation.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2008/10/2008-tc3-update-impact-flash-imaged.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2008/11/2008-tc3-trail-imaged-over-northern.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.it/2009/02/2008-tc3-fragments-recovered.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2014/01/small-asteroid-2014-aa-hit-earths_2.html

https://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2018/06/small-asteroid-2018-la-impacted-earth.html

https://remanzacco.blogspot.com/2019/06/small-asteroid-neocp-a10eom1-impacted.html

http://remanzacco.blogspot.com/search/label/asteroid%20impact


By Ernesto Guido


Thursday, January 13, 2022

James Webb Space Telescope - Images & Animation

Named after James E. Webb, who was the administrator of NASA from 1961 to 1968, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a space telescope intended to succeed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The JWST with its primary mirror of 6.5 meters (made of 18 hexagonal gold-plated beryllium segments) and a sunshield the size of a tennis court, promises to usher in a new era of astronomy with its capability to observe some of the oldest, most distant objects in the Universe, viewing up to 100 times fainter than HST. After three decades from conception through design, JWST was launched December 25, 2021 and will orbit the Sun near the second Lagrange point (L2) of the Sun-Earth system.

 

 Credit: Northrop Grumman, NASA/Chris Gunn

JWST can be easily seen from Earth as its magnitude is now around 14. The image and the animation below show the James Webb Space Telescope travelling towards its final destination. The images were taken on Jan 12, 2022 at 02:30 UTC by Ernesto Guido, Marco Rocchetto and Adriano Valvasori via Telescope Live using the Planewave CDK24 60-cm telescope installed at El Sauce Observatory, Chile (CHI-1). Click on each image for a bigger version. 



At the imaging time, JWST was around 741,900 miles away from Earth, almost 82 percent of the way to its destination. You can see where is Webb at any time on this webpage.

 


Below another image of JWST imaged by A. Valvasori & E. Guido via ALMO observatoy (MPC code G18 - Italy)  on January 07, 2022



Below a lightcurve of JWST spanning about 4 hours. 179 exposures, each 60sec in duration obtained by Daniel Parrott using his software TYCHO

 

 


By Ernesto Guido



Friday, December 31, 2021

Comet Leonard's show and other comet photos

With just a few hours to go before the end of 2021, while the comet C/2021 A1 (Leonard) show is still going on, one last post of the year to thank all the readers of this blog. See you again in 2022, with the hope that there will be clear skies for everyone. According to M. Meyer, 2021 had 68 new comets (2020: 76, 2019: 64) of which 4 were amateur discoveries (2020: 5, 2019: 2). Top 3: PANSTARRS: 23; Mt. Lemmon/Catalina: 13/4; ATLAS: 8. Here's a short roundup of cometary photos starting with the most beautiful comet of 2021 and probably one of the best in recent years. (Click on each image below for a bigger version). 


COMET C/2021 A1 (Leonard) imaged on December 28, 2021 by Ernesto Guido, Marco Rocchetto & Adriano Valvasori via Telescope Live network (MPC code Q56, Australia).


Credit: E. Guido, M. Rocchetto, A. Valvasori


COMET C/2021 A1 (Leonard) imaged on December 31, 2021 by Ernesto Guido, Marco Rocchetto & Adriano Valvasori via Telescope Live network (MPC code Q56, Australia).

Credit: E. Guido, M. Rocchetto, A. Valvasori



COMET 108P/Ciffreo imaged on December 14, 2021 by Ernesto Guido, Marco Rocchetto & Adriano Valvasori through a 0.7 m f/8 Ritchey Chretien + CCD via Telescope Live network (MPC code Z08, Oria, Spain).

Credit: E. Guido, M. Rocchetto, A. Valvasori, E. Bryssinck


COMET C/2019 L3 (Atlas) imaged on December 13, 2021 by Adriano Valvasori & Ernesto Guido via ALMO observatory (MPC code G18, Italy).



COMET 67P (Churyumov–Gerasimenko) imaged on December 12, 2021 by Adriano Valvasori & Ernesto Guido via ALMO observatory (MPC code G18, Italy).


COMET C/2021 A1 (Leonard) imaged on November 30, 2021 by Adriano Valvasori & Ernesto Guido via ALMO observatory (MPC code G18, Italy).


COMET 29P (Schwassmann–Wachmann) imaged on October 11, 2021 by Adriano Valvasori & Ernesto Guido via ALMO observatory (MPC code G18, Italy).


COMET 4P (Faye) imaged on October 03, 2021 by Adriano Valvasori & Ernesto Guido via ALMO observatory (MPC code G18, Italy).



by Ernesto Guido